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First Impressions: Wizard of Legend

Wizard of Legend is a top-down 2D roguelike where you play as an unnamed wizard who must make their way through a procedurally generated dungeon filled with enemies and traps. Roguelikes are one of my favorite genres, and while there’s plenty to choose from, Wizard of Legend immediately caught my eye with its intriguing aesthetic and gorgeous artstyle. Of course, it takes more than just an appealing visage to make a great game; does Wizard of Legend have what it takes to join the impressive pantheon of roguelike games?
In Wizard of Legend, you play as a powerful mage who can harness the arcane abilities of the 5 major elements: fire, earth, water, air, and lightning. There is a massive variety of spells which you can acquire, but as a roguelike the journey to do so will not be easy. No matter how many spells you’ve unlocked, however, you can only equip 4 at the start of each run, so it’s important to find a strong, synergistic combination as quickly as possible.
As you crawl your way through the procedurally generated dungeon, you’ll encounter no shortage of brutally difficult enemies. Most of the time you don’t have to kill the enemies if you don’t want to, but occasionally you’ll be locked in a room and forced to fight for survival. The fight won’t be easy either: the enemies in this game are all surprisingly resilient. While this isn’t a negative in and of itself, it does end up manifesting some undesirable gameplay mechanics. For example, because it takes so many hits to defeat even the weakest of enemies, a lot of the combat ends up feeling like little more than ambitious button mashing.
Speaking of combat, remember how I said the enemies are surprisingly resilient? Well, you’re the opposite. The most minor of enemy can prove to be quite the pest when encountered in abundance or paired with a stronger foe. This is largely due to the prevalence of crowd control in the game, both you and your opposition rely on things like stuns, freezes, and knockbacks in order to effectively battle. If you get hit by one form of crowd control, odds are you’re going to get hit by another one immediately after, meaning that you can easily lose half your health in one combo. Ultimately, this makes it so that your focus has to be much more attuned to dodging enemy attacks rather than landing your own.
Thankfully, due to the way spells are categorized in this game, you always have a dash no matter your setup. Still, it creates a type of gameplay that’s at odds with itself. Dungeon crawler roguelikes are all about that fast-paced, high octane gameplay where your mechanics are pushed to the limit as you avoid attacks by the narrowest of margins while simultaneously landing your own. In Wizard of Legend, it’s usually one or the other. This is primarily because of the existence of cooldowns on your spells, some of which can be quite long. The gameplay often goes like this: you land your abilities, run around or hide for 6 seconds until the cooldowns refresh, then you land your abilities again; rinse and repeat. Successfully defeat the boss at the end of the level and you'll earn some loot and move on to the next (without healing).
Wizard of Legend has its merits and certainly isn’t a bad game, but it’s also nowhere near as good as some of its contemporaries. The combat does bring some new mechanics to the table with the wide variety of skills and has the ability to be very satisfying, especially when you’re comboing your spells, but it takes a long time to acquire and learn the right setup for your desired playstyle. The bosses and combat are genuinely tough, which to me is a positive, but the lack of enemy variety means that it’s easy to encounter most of the main game enemies within just a couple hours of playing. Overall, while I mostly enjoyed the time I spent with Wizard of Legend, I’d honestly rather just go back to playing something like Enter the Gungeon when I feel the need to scratch that roguelike dungeon crawler itch.
 
Ryan’s Rating: 3/5
 
Wizard of Legend retails for $16 and is available on PC, PS4, Xbox One, and Nintendo Switch.
 
You can check out my review of Enter the Gungeon here:

First Impressions: Wizard of Legend +4
First Impressions: Wizard of Legend
Ryan
Ryan Ryan
verified Admin 4d

Spellbreak • New Rune: Shadowstep

I like to play a little bit of Spellbreak every day or so. It’s really a solid Fantasy-themed take on the BR genre. I love it, and wish we had a lounge for it. *nudge nudge* That said, now we have a new rune: Shadowstep. As the stealthy ninja that I am, I’m loving this.
#PlaySpellbreak

———/-/———
“The Shadowstep rune is now available in your Spellbreak matches! Become invisible and quickly dash in the direction you're moving. If you like Dash and Invisibility, you'll love the rune that does both!

---

Spellbreak is a multiplayer action-spellcasting game where you unleash your inner battlemage. Master elemental magic to fit your playstyle and cast powerful spell combinations to dominate other players across the Hollow Lands. Learn more at https://playspellbreak.com”
Link: https://youtu.be/fVhiDfH5s3s

Spellbreak • New Rune: Shadowstep
ObliviousRex
ObliviousRex ObliviousRex
verified LV.35 Mod 2d

What is everybody’s favorite Indie Game?

My favorite indie game is hollow knight, bet indie game I’ve ever played

What is everybody’s favorite Indie Game?
CaptainPanda
CaptainPanda CaptainPanda
LV.22 Fast as Lightning 2d

COME AND JOIN!!! 😁😁😁

I'm Streaming The Evil Within! And enjoy my manly screams 😄...

COME AND JOIN!!! 😁😁😁
°~A•Lost•Traveler~°
°~A•Lost•Traveler~° °~A•Lost•Traveler~°
LV.23 Link 3d

I'm Going To Be Streaming The Evil Within, Come And Join! 😅

Pray For Me???

I'm Going To Be Streaming The Evil Within, Come And Join! 😅
I'm Going To Be Streaming The Evil Within, Come And Join! 😅
°~A•Lost•Traveler~°
°~A•Lost•Traveler~° °~A•Lost•Traveler~°
LV.23 Link 4d

This is what it looks like if Postal 2 was in VR and Steam's logo looks like a d*ck 😐

#Postal2 #clips #streamhighlights

This is what it looks like if Postal 2 was in VR and Steam's logo looks like a d*ck 😐
This is what it looks like if Postal 2 was in VR and Steam's logo looks like a d*ck 😐
VauseKV
VauseKV VauseKV
LV.22 Dream Chaser 5d

Ryan's Always Right: Oxenfree

Oxenfree is a supernatural mystery adventure game where you play as Alex, a high school student who is heading off to a local island for an all-night beach party with her friends. A paranormal walking sim filled with teenage drama wouldn’t normally be my cup of tea, but considering that Oxenfree has earned widespread praise, won several award nominations, and has been sitting in my library untouched for the better part of a year, I figured it was finally time to put my biases aside and see what Oxenfree is all about.
Oxenfree begins with Alex, her friend and schoolmate Ren, and her new step-brother Jonas travelling on the ferry towards Edwards Island, a former naval station and mining town that is now mostly abandoned. As is tradition at Alex’s school, the upperclassmen are all expected to meet at Edwards Island for a massive alcohol-fueled party, but upon arrival it becomes brutally apparent that this year’s group will be much, much smaller as only 2 other students, Nora and Clarissa, have come. Unfortunately, you don’t really know Nora (or Jonas) and you don’t get along with Clarissa; your only real friend in the group is Ren and he is planning to spend the night trying to woo Nora who he has long had a crush on.
Although your small group of 5 has all come for a fun, relaxing night of beer drinking on the beach, things quickly go awry as tensions rise amongst the group and supernatural activity begins to make its presence known. At its very core, Oxenfree is all about how you choose to manage these social tensions as you attempt to unravel the mysteries of Edwards Island and learn more about your past.
As a walking sim, the gameplay in Oxenfree revolves heavily around moving from point A to point B while chatting with the other characters. Dialogue is everything in this game and your choices can, and will, have major repercussions on the outcome of your playthrough. The puzzling aspects of Oxenfree are pretty minor and mostly consist of tuning your portable radio, which is your main tool in this game, to a specific frequency. Your radio has a special connection with the island and its supernatural abilities; a fact you’ll want to take advantage of if you’re hoping to fully unravel the mystery and find all the secrets that Edwards Island has to offer.
In terms of quality, this game is a bit of a mixed bag. In many ways it’s a classic case of “I know what they were going for here, but it just didn’t turn out right.” For example, let’s examine dialogue since it’s by far the most important part of the game. The voice acting is absolutely phenomenal, the dialogue choices are impactful, and the conversational quality is extremely realistic: the characters in Oxenfree often cut eachother off, behave inappropriately, and let their emotions get the better of them. On the other hand, there is often little clarity regarding a dialogue option’s impact, and the game typically requires you to choose your dialogue option before the character you’re talking has finished speaking. If you wait for the character to finish talking so that you can make an informed choice, your dialogue options will disappear and the outcome of your game will be changed.
Oxenfree is a pretty difficult game to rate. I think the vast majority of players would actually enjoy this game, but I also don’t think this game is particularly great. The atmosphere is executed wonderfully yet the story and gameplay pacing seem to really fall off about two-thirds of the way through the game. Furthermore I found the ending to be lackluster, which was really a shame because I was pretty engrossed in the mystery and considered the premise of the story to be rather captivating. Overall, I feel other games have executed the Oxenfree concept to a more innovative or higher level (Life is Strange, Night in the Woods), but I still think Oxenfree is worth at least one playthrough for most players.
 
Ryan’s Rating: 3.75/5
 
Oxenfree retails for $10 and is available on PC, Xbox One, PS4, Nintendo Switch, and Mobile.
 
Speaking of Night in the Woods, you can check out my review for it right here:

Ryan's Always Right: Oxenfree +4
Ryan's Always Right: Oxenfree
Ryan
Ryan Ryan
verified Admin 11d

I will make you a pfp

I will make you a pfp
Maddddier
Maddddier Maddddier
LV.19 Best Squadmate 7d

Fall Guys Meets Beat Saber

This is for all of the jelly beans who thought it would be funny to pull people off the Slime Climb level :)
Die.
𝙁𝙪𝙡𝙡 𝙫𝙞𝙙𝙚𝙤 𝙝𝙚𝙧𝙚: https://youtu.be/Mkrtvt75OFY
 
Subscribe on YouTube or follow me on Moot for more content!
#BeatSaber
#FallGuys #videos

Fall Guys Meets Beat Saber
Fall Guys Meets Beat Saber
VauseKV
VauseKV VauseKV
LV.22 Dream Chaser 9d

What is the best indie game for wiiu?

What is the best indie game for wiiu?
What is the best indie game for wiiu?
Mememe
Mememe Mememe
LV.7 Nomad 9d

Starting OneShot game stream

I was told, that Oneshot is quite a piece of art. I am intrigued and let's discover this hidden gem of a game. Maybe even try to complete it?
 
Anyway, stream starts NOW!
https://www.twitch.tv/mrangryducky

Starting OneShot game stream
AngryDucky
AngryDucky AngryDucky
LV.22 I Love Food 11d

First Impressions: Yooka-Laylee and the Impossible Lair

Yooka-Laylee and the Impossible Lair is a 2.5D platform game inspired by the classic title Donkey Kong Country. Unlike the first Yooka-Laylee which was 3D, the bulk of the Impossible Lair takes place as a 2D side-scroller. I wasn’t really a fan of the original game but I typically like 2D platformers much more than 3D platformers so I figured it was worth giving the sequel a shot. What new things does Yooka-Laylee and the Impossible Lair bring to the table?
In Yooka-Laylee and the Impossible Lair, your ultimate goal is to successfully make it to the end of the evil Capital B’s “Impossible Lair” in order to stop him from completing the “Bee Hive” which would grant him control over all bees. Interestingly, the Impossible Lair is the very first level of the game, but it is extremely difficult difficult and defeating the appropriately named level will not be easy.
In order to increase your chances of survival in the Impossible Lair, you must accumulate “Beettalion” bees which will increase your durability by 1 hit per bee in the final showdown. Beettalion bees can be found in chapter worlds which exist within the overall “Overworld.” The worlds aren’t only different in name; Chapter Worlds are 2D while the Overworld is 3D. You must explore and complete challenges in the Overworld in order to access new Chapter Worlds which in turn help you explore the Overworld. For example, you might unblock a stream in the Overworld which then floods one of the Chapter Worlds, creating an entirely new version of the level.
As you progress through the Overworld and Chapter Worlds, you’ll encounter secrets and acquire various items that can help you along your journey. For example, you’ll need quills to bribe NPCs and unlock mysteries, T.W.I.T. coins to get past Trowzer's "paywalls," and Tonics to unlock special alterations which can make gameplay both easier and more difficult. In terms of collectibles, this game’s got a ton for those who like to explore and replay levels to master every inch of them. At the same time, those who want to breeze through and just beat the levels as quickly as possible can do so without too much downside to worry about.
Unfortunately Yooka-Laylee and the Impossible Lair suffers from many of the same issues as its predecessor. Even in 2D mode, the controls are pretty inconsistent and lack precision. The game feels great when you’re flying through levels, but the slower more platform-heavy levels end up feeling cumbersome because of the unsatisfying controls. Much of the writing and atmosphere of the game is also lackluster, which makes slogging through some of the more tedious parts of the game feel even less satisfying because the payoff is some long, uninteresting, low-level pun-filled dialogue.
Yooka-Laylee and the Impossible Lair improves upon the original Yooka-Laylee overall, but it still leaves a lot to be desired. The incredible amount of collectibles and the possibility of exploration will appeal to some, however those who are looking for a crisp, precise platforming experience will likely find this game to fall short. With that being said, this game still offers an incredible amount of content with enough bright moments that players who are already fans of 3D platformers will likely be more than happy to add the Impossible Lair to their collection.
 
Ryan’s Rating: 3.5/5
 
Yooka-Laylee and the Impossible Lair retails for $30 and is available on PC, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and Nintendo Switch.
 
P.S. Into the Breach is currently available for free from Epic Games this week. It’s a great game that you should definitely pick up; you can read my review of it here:

First Impressions: Yooka-Laylee and the Impossible Lair +4
First Impressions: Yooka-Laylee and the Impossible Lair
Ryan
Ryan Ryan
verified Admin 18d

Live on Twitch

Let’s break some spells

https://twitch.tv/scrapsready_gaming

Live on Twitch
ScrapsReady
ScrapsReady ScrapsReady
LV.21 Shadow 18d

Ryan's Always Right: Little Nightmares

Little Nightmares is a horror themed puzzle-platforming adventure game where you play as a child who must overcome their fears. I’m typically not a fan of horror games but Little Nightmares has been recommended to me by multiple people and has earned widespread critical acclaim. Considering that Little Nightmares 2 was just announced and is launching next year, I figured it was finally time to give the original a try and see what the series is all about.
In Little Nightmares you play as a small, hungry child who must progress through a perilous series of nightmare-inducing environments. Armed with nothing but a lighter, the world is a big, scary place for a small kid; it’s dark and you’re all alone. Using a combination of puzzle solving and platforming, you must survive the many dangers of your frightening world and cleverly make your way through each stage in an effort to escape.
Little Nightmares is described as a horror game but it’s really not. It definitely has a creepy vibe, but I found that, for the most part, the game didn’t try to be overtly scary. Its goal is to be reminiscent of childhood fears rather than to make you scared in the present, and it does a fantastic job of maintaining this aesthetic. The game in general does everything it can to make you feel like a young child. For example, everything in the game, from doors to chairs to lamps, is absolutely massive in comparison to you. The top of a table is a long way up just like it would be to a small kid. You traverse through environments like play rooms and kitchens; you’re entirely in the world of a child.
Little Nightmares has a heavy emphasis on 3D gameplay which sets it apart from similar games such as Inside, but it brings as many downsides as it does positives. While it increases the capacity for exploration and platforming, it ultimately doesn’t work well with other core aspects of the gameplay. For example, there are often long, difficult platforming routes that look interesting but eventually lead to dead ends. This can be especially annoying because the platforming controls are often janky and the respawn points are often distant, meaning that you waste significant amounts of time doing something challenging for absolutely nothing.
Overall I don’t really have much negative to say about Little Nightmares aside from the lackluster platforming and exploration. While I didn’t find it to be nearly as good as Inside (which Little Nightmares seemed to take great inspiration from) I still found the game to be an enjoyable experience throughout. It’s fairly short for its price tag, but I think Little Nightmares provides widespread appeal and that most players would find it to be a worthwhile game despite its brevity.
 
Ryan’s Rating: 4/5
 
Little Nightmares retails for $20 and is available on PC, PS4, Xbox One, Nintendo Switch, and Google Stadia.

Ryan's Always Right: Little Nightmares +3
Ryan's Always Right: Little Nightmares
Ryan
Ryan Ryan
verified Admin 25d

Have you played The Messenger?

The Messenger is 2 years old now, and it’s fantastic. The humor is on point, the music is incredible (I own the soundtrack, yeah...), the gameplay is tough but oh-so-smooth... you’re truly missing out if you haven’t played the game. If you’re on Xbox, The Messenger is on Game Pass. Give it a try, gamers. If you have any affinity for 2-D games, play it.
(And Carrion, but that is a very different game.)
Trailer: https://youtu.be/2vaYsgOHTlI


Also, you have a shot to win the game on social media.
Source: https://twitter.com/messengergame/status/1301517082123735041?s=21


But wait, there’s more! The Messenger soundtrack, but only part one: https://youtu.be/YFOa9SErWzY

Have you played The Messenger? +1
Have you played The Messenger?
ObliviousRex
ObliviousRex ObliviousRex
verified LV.35 Mod 20d

I made a gosh darn pummel party video!

I have been trying to get 6 subscribers a day so that I can get 1k by the end of the year so please consider subscribing!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q1ngh3a9o20

I made a gosh darn pummel party video!
Jaxonian Dante
Jaxonian Dante Jaxonian Dante
LV.8 Nomad 1mo

Spellbreak • Launch Cinematic Trailer

I’ve been looking forward to this one since before it was announced for any console, but now I’m very happy that I’ll get to play it on Xbox, and so very soon too!
#PlaySpellbreak

———/-/———

“Become the Ultimate Battlemage! Spellbreak launches free-to-play on September 3, 2020 for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Nintendo Switch, and Windows PC (Epic Games store)!

Spellbreak is a multiplayer action-spellcasting game where you unleash your inner battlemage. Master elemental magic to fit your playstyle and cast powerful spell combinations to dominate other players across the Hollow Lands. Access your Spellbreak player account and play with anyone on all supported platforms with cross-progression, cross-play, and cross-party features at launch. Learn more at playspellbreak.com.”

Link: https://youtu.be/pSmvbSFUDf8

Spellbreak • Launch Cinematic Trailer
ObliviousRex
ObliviousRex ObliviousRex
verified LV.35 Mod 1mo

First Impressions: Enter the Gungeon

Enter the Gungeon is a rougelike bullet hell dungeon crawler where you must navigate through increasingly difficult levels in an effort to find a legendary gun capable of changing the past. Despite the fact that Enter the Gungeon has earned widespread critical acclaim and has been patiently sitting in my gaming library for over a year, I had completely neglected playing it until now. Epic Games is giving away Enter the Gungeon for free this week, so I figured it was finally time to break it out and see what the Gungeon is all about.
In Enter the Gungeon, you must lead your chosen character through labyrinth-like levels called chambers. Chambers are broken up into rooms, each with its own offering. Most rooms are chock-full with enemies, however each chamber also has a shop room as well as the occasional treasure chest room or “story” room. For the most part, you never know what inhabits a room until you enter it, and once you enter a room with enemies the doors lock behind you, trapping you inside until all of your foes are defeated. Your foes won’t be defeated easily though, and because you don’t automatically heal between chambers or chambers, you must make the most of your dodge roll and evasive skills to preserve your health for the challenges ahead.
Your ultimate goal within each chamber is to reach and defeat the boss at the end, but there’s a lot of nuance involved in actually doing so. Each run is different from the last and the chambers act as labyrinths, so unless you acquire a special item like the map, you have no way of knowing where the boss lies. Furthermore, even if you encounter the boss relatively quickly, you still may be incentivized to continue exploring the chamber in an effort to find more gear and be better prepared for the difficult road ahead. Oh, and when I say difficult, I mean difficult. As with most bullet hell games, Enter the Gungeon does not shy away from brutally challenging, micro-mechanic demanding gameplay.
Although you have a handful of different characters to choose from at the start, as a rougelike, much of your loadout will be determined by the things you encounter and acquire throughout your run. Enter the Gungeon has no shortage of weapons and items, and unlike many games where the differences between weapons is pretty straightforward, the guns in Enter the Gungeon feel truly unique. This makes it so that every run feels dynamic and exciting, providing an unbelievably wide variety of gameplay possibilities. This also means that when you die, which you inevitably will, you want nothing more than to hop back in and try again.
Despite the fact that each run is self-contained, there are still elements which transcend each run and contribute to future playthroughs. As you explore the chambers, you’ll encounter special rooms and challenges that can enable you to unlock future benefits. For example, when you defeat a boss you earn a unique, secondary type of currency which can be spent in special shops to purchase things like new weapons and items. While these items aren’t guaranteed to show up in your next run, expanding your arsenal grants you the potential to encounter powerful items in the future and greatly increase your chances of success.
Enter the Gungeon is exactly what I look for in a roguelike. It’s extremely challenging yet entirely fair in the difficulties it presents. The incredibly wide variety of tools at your disposal combined with the immensely diverse cast of enemies makes every run feel unique and exciting, and although there are some learn-by-dying aspects, most of the mechanics are quick to recognize even if they’re difficult to execute. To be quite honest, any complaint that I have about Enter the Gungeon is so minor that it's not even worth mentioning here. This game is awesome.
 
Ryan’s Rating: 5/5
 
Enter the Gungeon retails for $15 and is available on PC, PS4, Xbox One, and Nintendo Switch. It’s also available FOR FREE on the Epic Games Store from now until August 27. As long as you claim the game by August 27, it’ll stay in your library forever, so it’s definitely worth picking up even if you’re not planning on playing it in the immediate future.

First Impressions: Enter the Gungeon +4
First Impressions: Enter the Gungeon
Ryan
Ryan Ryan
verified Admin 1mo

Should I tag them? I'm gonna tag them.

I was watching TwoSetViolin play the song and attempted the full combo myself.
Full video here:
Follow me on Moot or subscribe on YouTube for more content!
#BeatSaber
#videos

Should I tag them? I'm gonna tag them.
Should I tag them? I'm gonna tag them.
VauseKV
VauseKV VauseKV
LV.22 Dream Chaser 1mo

Twelve Minutes • Cast Reveal Trailer

“TWELVE MINUTES is an interactive thriller about a man trapped in a time loop. Featuring James McAvoy, Daisy Ridley, and Willem Dafoe. Coming soon to Xbox Series X, Xbox One, and PC. Wishlist now: http://annapurna.link/12minutes

Developed by LUIS ANTONIO. Published by Annapurna Interactive.”

Link: https://youtu.be/TLm44MLaXd4

Twelve Minutes • Cast Reveal Trailer
ObliviousRex
ObliviousRex ObliviousRex
verified LV.35 Mod 1mo

Yo kai watch 3 trade

Can someone trade me a shurikenny and you can ask me what you want in return

Yo kai watch 3 trade
Sonicgeorge06
Sonicgeorge06 Sonicgeorge06
LV.11 Champion 1mo

Ryan's Always Right: ABZU

ABZU is a fish-filled underwater adventure game where you play as a deep sea diver who has set out to explore the environment under the oceans. With its laid-back atmosphere and calming aesthetic, Abzu has garnered a wave of rave reviews praising the game’s artistic vision and wordless narrative design. What does Abzu have waiting for us beneath the surface?
In Abzu, you play as a nameless diver and must explore your underwater surroundings, seeking to learn more about the strange world, its history, and its inhabitants. Although much of the game is spent doing nothing more than gazing at the stunning environments and marine life, there is a story in Abzu even though the game does not contain any text and dialogue. Simply by progressing along your journey and realizing your unique capabilities, you will help restore vitality and vibrancy to the world of the aquatic.
The gameplay in Abzu is fairly akin to that of a walking sim, or in this case, a swimming sim. You move from one spot to the next, solving very trivial tasks in order to reach the next area. Most of Abzu isn’t really a game you play, but rather a game that happens around you. Abzu’s strengths are undeniably its atmosphere and aesthetic, and that’s exactly where the game tries to focus your attention. This game’s modus operandi is for you to sit and watch the fish, swim around a bit and explore, and then eventually get around to saving the world.
Unfortunately, despite how stunning and immersive the underwater environments can be, there are many regards in which Abzu leaves something to be desired. The controls are pretty poor and the game constantly feels at odds with the degree of freedom it wants to give you. Abzu presents itself as an exploration game, but there’s really nowhere to explore. Your progression through the serene waters is very linear and streamlined; there are surprisingly few places that you can actually explore and even fewer things to find once you’re there.
Abzu also suffered in its pacing and core gameplay loop. Movement is the entire game in Abzu yet movement is extremely slow. There’s a speed up movement button but it’s coded so that you can’t use it very often. Not only that, but the game frequently toggles between player-controlled movement and computer-controlled movement, creating situations where you literally take your hands off the controller and do nothing for extended times. This can get especially tiring considering that you essentially just do the same thing over and over in this game ad nauseum: open a door, find a shrine, free the fishes, rinse and repeat.
Overall, I feel like Abzu is a good experience but not necessarily a good game. Its strengths are very strong and do enough to carry the game’s weaknesses across its short duration, but the game certainly had its lulls and definitely would have benefitted from more dynamic gameplay. If you’re a fan of calm, relaxing games where you can turn your mind off and just enjoy the serenity, then you’ll probably love Abzu. Otherwise, I’d recommend giving this one a pass.
 
Ryan’s Rating: 3/5
 
ABZU retails for $20 and is available on PC, PS4, Xbox One, and Nintendo Switch.

Ryan's Always Right: ABZU +4
Ryan's Always Right: ABZU
Ryan
Ryan Ryan
verified Admin 1mo

A Way Out: A split-screen, multiplayer experience [minor spoiler warning]

I’ve recently completed A Way Out with my girlfriend and the whole game was a ride from start to finish. This is somewhat half a review, and half a rant of A Way Out. With its unique take on multiplayer, it is written by filmmaker turned game developer, Josef Fares of Brothers: A Tale of Two Sons fame.
 
A Way Out requires you to play with a friend but the good news is you only need one copy of the game, even if you are playing online co-op because A Way Out allows you to generate a friend pass to give to your friend and a trial version will appear in their library. Nifty! This was a detail that I completely missed because I haven’t read anything on it until after I finished the game. So you’re welcome. I’m saving you some hard-earned cash if you’re like me and haven’t seen or heard of this game before. Now let’s get down to gaming!
 
A Way Out as a whole is a story about breaking out of prison, and escaping the law enforcement. You start out in a prison setting. As Vincent, you will go through the process of being checked into the prison while as Leo, you’re loitering around the fence, seeing who the new faces are. Eventually, the both of you will make your way into the courtyard, where your paths will cross and the story truly begins. If you paid enough attention, you will be able to spot a Prison Break reference (T-Bag’s pocket, anyone?) when interacting with prisoners, which made me laugh and reminisce the times when I was younger and would watch Prison Break with my dad.
 
𝙏𝙝𝙚 𝙂𝙤𝙤𝙙
The split-screen co-op is the one thing I wished more narrative games did to incorporate the possibility of more co-op play. I feel like a lot of single player titles would have benefited immensely from the possibility of split-screen co-ops. A good narrative game shouldn’t have to be limited to being a single player experience. The cinematics were magnificently well done too and the seamless transition from one character to another during cinematic chases is more than commendable. Every time it happens, it’s always a pleasure to watch.
 
Other than that, the co-op tasks were great, and I liked seeing how our interaction would play out on each of our sides of the screen. The pacing of the story is good as well with slow moments interjecting the hectic running when you need to escape law enforcement. You also get to indulge in mini-games like playing Connect 4 with each other in the hospital, or show off your musicality on the banjo/piano in the old couple’s home (my favourite). In a way, you control your pace as well when you decide to have a go at the mini games.
𝙏𝙝𝙚 𝙏𝙤𝙡𝙚𝙧𝙖𝙗𝙡𝙚
Vincent and Leo each have their own unique way of dealing with situations. With Leo being the hot-headed one ready to punch out anyone who stood in his way, Vincent is the calmer and rational counterpart who prefers negotiating his way out. We did the first playthrough by choosing only Vincent’s way and did a second playthrough with Leo’s way to see if the story would be different. This is when the illusion of choice shatters because there is virtually no difference between choosing Vincent’s or Leo’s way for almost all of the choice scenarios. The only one that has a different outcome is where you have to decide whether you want to jump out of the plane or land it first. It made the second playthrough incredibly underwhelming.
 
𝙏𝙝𝙚 𝙁𝙪𝙣𝙣𝙮 𝘼𝙛𝙩𝙚𝙧𝙩𝙖𝙨𝙩𝙚
The story was good right until you finish the heist and land the plane. You think it is over and done with, that each of them can go back to their families and live in peaceful hiding. But the fact that I played through the story and was encouraged to think that was exactly why I felt cheated when the ending revealed itself. It hit me like a train. I could feel the instantaneous dislike for the character I was playing and with each passing moment of the ending, it skyrocketed. I could feel the slime of his actions, and the coldness of his faked emotions and responses crawl up my skin. How could he?
Many would argue that that is what good writing is. When they surprise you with the unexpected, and perhaps on certain occasions, I would agree. Not in this case, however, because it felt like someone pulled the carpet from under me and I fell and hit my head first. Yes, it was a surprise ending, but it wasn’t a satisfying one, and that makes it debatable on whether it is good or not.
𝘾𝙤𝙣𝙘𝙡𝙪𝙨𝙞𝙤𝙣
Even though it was hard for me to complete the game afterwards and the eventual ending gave me no closure, I did finish it. I also played it twice for the sake of curiosity despite not liking it as much as when I first started. For a game that builds around the idea of duality, from the split screen co-op, to completing tasks, it comes as a surprise to find that it’s really only one story. As explained above, I thought it had replay value but I was proven wrong on that count too. In general, it is still a good game even though I was harsh in my opinion of it. But if co-op or action-packed games is your cup of tea, this is a good one with a refreshing take on the aforementioned genre.
 
-
Follow me on Moot for more content! If you want early access to game analysis/breakdowns, behind the scenes updates, feel free to visit my Patreon page here: https://www.patreon.com/VauseKV
 
#thoughtcabinet
#awayout

A Way Out: A split-screen, multiplayer experience [minor spoiler warning] +2
A Way Out: A split-screen, multiplayer experience [minor spoiler warning]
VauseKV
VauseKV VauseKV
LV.22 Dream Chaser 1mo

Favourite hollow knight character

What’s yours mine’s Grimm

Favourite hollow knight character
Sonicgeorge06
Sonicgeorge06 Sonicgeorge06
LV.11 Champion 1mo

Blub

Blub
Blub
mr slmander yt
mr slmander yt mr slmander yt
LV.11 Chief 1mo

Duck Game

Does anyone ever play this game, on PS4, or Switch?

Duck Game
TNXaro
TNXaro TNXaro
LV.15 Chief 1mo

Cuisine Royale

Does anyone play this game often in PS4?

Cuisine Royale
TNXaro
TNXaro TNXaro
LV.15 Chief 1mo

First Impressions: Reky

Reky is a logic puzzle game where you must navigate increasingly complex and difficult levels with your unnamed blob character. Having recently launched to widespread positive reviews, Reky caught my eye with its minimalist architectural aesthetic and unusual level design. Does Reky’s gameplay live up to its surface-level appeal?
Reky begins with a brief, wordless tutorial that introduces the game’s basic mechanics. In short, colors have the power to activate inactive white boxes. Once a box is activated, it can then be tapped and moved to its predetermined alternate location. You must activate and move the correct boxes in just the right way in order to lead your blob from its starting location to the ending block and make it to the next level.
Although Reky follows a very simple set of rules, its gameplay can actually be quite challenging. Unfortunately, this is largely in part to the game’s lack of clarity regarding how the pieces move. For the most part, it’s pretty much impossible to tell how a block will move once activated unless you actually go through the work of activating it and finding out. Depending on the level, this can be a pretty arduous task. Many levels have blocks that don’t contribute to the solution at all and exist just to throw you off the trail.
Reky judges your performance for each level based on how many “jumps” or moves it takes you to complete it. Although this is a fine mechanic in and of itself, it’s implemented rather poorly. Because the game uses a learn-by-trying style of gameplay, it doesn’t make sense to judge performance based on the number of moves it takes to complete a puzzle. It’s impossible to look at a puzzle and see the solution ahead of time because it’s impossible to know how the mechanics will work until you actually go an interact with them.
Reky is a fine little puzzle game for a casual time waster but it’s not something that I think demands any special attention. Although it has a nice aesthetic and some fairly unique gameplay, Reky doesn’t execute anything to a high enough level to make me feel compelled to complete all 96 of its levels. That said, it might appeal to those who like learn-by-trying type puzzle games or who are looking for something chill yet challenging to pass the time.
 
Ryan’s Rating: 2/5
 
Reky retails for $5 and is available on PC, iOS, Android, and Nintendo Switch.

First Impressions: Reky +3
First Impressions: Reky
Ryan
Ryan Ryan
verified Admin 2mo

Geometry dash extreme demon first try

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LbJaWCWSmjc

Geometry dash extreme demon first try
DaPi
DaPi DaPi
LV.32 Happy 2020! 1mo

The map is cursed, I keep missing the ONE 😞

Could have full combo-ed it but the universe says no.
Full video here:
I would greatly appreciate it if you follow me on Moot or subscribe to my YouTube for more content 🤩 Thank you for watching!
#VR
#BeatSaber #virtualreality #videos

The map is cursed, I keep missing the ONE 😞
The map is cursed, I keep missing the ONE 😞
VauseKV
VauseKV VauseKV
LV.22 Dream Chaser 2mo

Ryan's Always Right: The Supper

The Supper is a free, bite-sized point-and-click adventure game where you play as a peculiar chef named Ms. Appleton. I’m not normally a fan of point-and-click games but considering that The Supper is free right now and currently has a perfect 10/10 rating on Steam, I decided to check it out. Is The Supper really worthy of its acclaim?
Ms. Appleton is a bizarre, zombie-like woman who has a mysterious voice in her head that talks to her and tells her what to do. More information about the voice will be revealed as you play the game, but I’ll keep this review spoiler-free. Although Ms. Appleton doesn’t look like much, she will soon show her capabilities as she tries to capitalize on the opportunity she’s been waiting for.
Ms. Appleton runs a small restaurant and your job is to help her prepare dishes for her hungry patrons. Of course, in this unusual world the customers have some pretty outlandish tastes, and you’ll have to go on a bit of an adventure to acquire the ingredients you need. Once you gather all the necessary ingredients you can then make a dish, enabling you to serve it to another satisfied customer and leading you one step closer to your goal.
In terms of gameplay, The Supper is pretty much what you expect from a point-and-click adventure game. You combine various things together and use your acquired arsenal of tools in order to solve minor puzzles and progress through the story. The puzzles aren’t particularly difficult but the fact that they all must be done in a particular order is a bit off putting as you constantly interact with things that have no purpose.
The Supper is fine for what it is but it certainly isn’t a 10/10 game. While the artstyle was pretty cool and the humor was on point at parts, the highlights of this game were few and far between, The story and gameplay were both pretty underwhelming and the writing left a lot to be desired. That said, the game was still entertaining enough to keep me engaged throughout its brief duration so it certainly wasn't all bad. Overall, the Supper didn't live up the hype and definitely didn't convert me into a fan of point-and-click adventures, but considering that it’s short and free-to-play, The Supper may be worthwhile for players who are fans of the genre or are looking for something a little bit different.
 
Ryan’s Rating: 2.5/5
 
The Supper is free and is available for PC on Steam and Itch.

Ryan's Always Right: The Supper +3
Ryan's Always Right: The Supper
Ryan
Ryan Ryan
verified Admin 2mo

Kenshi?

So like, what if we maybe... wore our skinsuits and held hands in the Ashlands until the acid rains melted us together? Doesn’t that sound nice?

Kenshi?
Kenshi?
An Inert Tongue
An Inert Tongue An Inert Tongue
LV.15 Chief 2mo

𝙁𝙧𝙤𝙯𝙚𝙣 𝙍𝙋𝙂 𝙤𝙧 𝙥𝙡𝙖𝙩𝙛𝙤𝙧𝙢𝙚𝙧 𝙬𝙝𝙚𝙣???

I watched the movie in the cinema, and when it ended that was my thought. The environment design in the movie was pretty amazing and I would legitimately play a Frozen RPG or platformer 😍 Alas, such things don't exist but THIS is a close 2nd 🤩
HD video here:
Follow me on Moot or subscribe to my YouTube for more content!
#BeatSaber
#videos

𝙁𝙧𝙤𝙯𝙚𝙣 𝙍𝙋𝙂 𝙤𝙧 𝙥𝙡𝙖𝙩𝙛𝙤𝙧𝙢𝙚𝙧 𝙬𝙝𝙚𝙣???
𝙁𝙧𝙤𝙯𝙚𝙣 𝙍𝙋𝙂 𝙤𝙧 𝙥𝙡𝙖𝙩𝙛𝙤𝙧𝙢𝙚𝙧 𝙬𝙝𝙚𝙣???
VauseKV
VauseKV VauseKV
LV.22 Dream Chaser 2mo

Any fans of risk of rain 2 on xbox?

Any fans of risk of rain 2 on xbox?
Michael Shane Johnso Michael Shane Johnso
LV.2 Lurker 2mo

Switch Indies coming this Summer

There's definitely some promising titles this year
 
Article: https://gamerant.com/nintendo-switch-indie-game-releases-summer-2020/

Switch Indies coming this Summer
moshking96
moshking96 moshking96
LV.23 Boo! 2mo

Seeing VR being used in other creative ways makes me happy 🤩

My very first VR experience was when I was in Trinity College in Dublin. Given my interest in art and being a psychology undergraduate, obviously I was going to visit the exhibition on expressing trauma through art that was held in their science gallery (Trauma: Built to Break). The one that really left an impression on me was Project Syria by Nonny de la Peña. Through my headset, a confused me was looking at what seemed to be normal life in the streets of Syria. I didn't get it because I wasn't paying attention to what kind of exhibition this was. What's so special? And that's when the bomb hit. Everything shattered in my view, the sound was loud, there was dust in my eyes. I was perfectly fine, but I also wasn't. The dust was in VR, but my reactions to it were very real. I had difficulties breathing and my eyes started watering. That experience shook me.
 
Though gaming is the primary way I engage with VR right now, and I seldom think about Project Syria, that experience never really left me. Without really realizing it, I've been constantly seeking to feel that level of empathy again through experiences like Tree VR or traversing through the vast alien environment in No Man's Sky.
 
Even though I'm within 4 walls, VR takes me to places that I can only imagine, and allows me to connect and feel deeply, truly, to the happenings around me, without the fear of being vulnerable. And I think that has really helped me have a more open mindset, and be more vulnerable with people I trust.
 
My personal wish is to see VR flourish and become more widely accepted/affordable not just for gaming, but for building social connections, for safer industrial training, to induce empathy and promote understanding in people, and to create amazing, breathtaking architecture/spaces in VR among tons of other things that VR is capable of.
 
https://vrscout.com/news/us-fire-administration-vr-firefighter-training/?fbclid=IwAR2YRXFK0SfvKrqqN7BGwSavMJMP6iG4vqQX8XOhXllscdf_QYHQzH6cfZE
#thoughtcabinet
#virtualreality

Seeing VR being used in other creative ways makes me happy 🤩
VauseKV
VauseKV VauseKV
LV.22 Dream Chaser 2mo

Ryan's Always Right: SUPERHOT: Mind Control Delete

SUPERHOT: Mind Control Delete is a first-person shooter where time only moves when the player moves. Mind Control Delete (MCD) is the sequel to the critically acclaimed SUPERHOT which has been masterfully branded as “the most innovative shooter in years.” The original SUPERHOT just barely snuck into my Top Games of the Decade list, securing the final spot at number 20. Does Mind Control Delete live up to the impressive precedent set by its predecessor?
Like the original game, MCD is centered around the idea that time only moves when you move. As glowing red enemies swarm upon you, you must slow down time and accurately determine your plan of attack before quickly executing precise, well-timed movements to dodge their bullets and land your own.
Despite the fact that Mind Control Debate is fundamentally the same as its predecessor in that time only moves when you move, many of the core gameplay elements are very different. Unlike the original game in which each level contains a specific setup, MCD heavily features roguelike elements and every level is completely randomized. Furthermore, instead of running through a predetermined set of sequences, MCD allows the player to take control of their destiny by enabling them to choose their path via a map of connected nodes. Each node has multiple levels and you must complete all of a node’s levels without dying in order to progress. This roguelike-style gameplay creates a much different experience much different from the original, as it replaces the puzzle elements with an entirely different type of decision-making.
MCD strikes a nice balance between enabling you to choose your path while still rewarding exploration. Even though you may have found the “exit” for the set of nodes you’re on, you’re still incentivized to fully complete the set in order to get the story-like elements and to learn new hacks. Hacks are special modifications to your gameplay and are the main feature of MCD that set it apart from SUPERHOT. Some of the hacks can be especially powerful, such as starting each round with a random gun, but they also require you to make tough choices. For example, do you take a fast movement hack so that you can dodge bullets more easily or do you take an extra life hack so that you can take an extra hit? These options make it so that each node can provide a unique experience should you choose it to.
Comparing MCD to its predecessor is a bit of a mixed bag. I love the dynamism that the hacks bring to the table, but the roguelike elements in general take away some of my favorite aspects of the original game. In the first SUPERHOT, each level was like a puzzle and you had to carefully calculate your moves in order to succeed. In the sequel, each individual level is pretty easy and there are no shortage of tools at your disposal that will bring you to victory. Again, this leads to a mixed feeling because the incredibly wide arsenal of weapons is extremely fun to play with, but it also creates the feeling that each individual choice is mostly irrelevant because everything is so effective.
Overall I enjoyed MCD, but I feel like it lacks some of the charm that made the first SUPERHOT so special. The levels, for the most part, lost a lot of the personality and intensity that were mainstays of the original. The dynamic nature of MCD does bring some fun and variety into the mix, but the choices end up feeling much less impactful than the decision making required in the first game. With all of that being said, despite the fact that SUPERHOT: Mind Control Delete isn’t nearly as innovative or interesting as the original SUPERHOT, I still consider it to be a worthy successor to one of my favorite games of this generation.
 
Ryan’s Rating: 4/5
 
SUPERHOT: Mind Control Delete retails for $25 and is available PC, Xbox One, and PlayStation 4. It's also currently on sale for $15 from now until July 23, and is completely free for players who purchased the original SUPERHOT prior to July 16.

Ryan's Always Right: SUPERHOT: Mind Control Delete +4
Ryan's Always Right: SUPERHOT: Mind Control Delete
Ryan
Ryan Ryan
verified Admin 2mo

NKH help

I need help defeating nightmare king Grimm I will accept charm loadouts because I have all of them and any easy way to beat him will be appreciated

NKH help
Sonicgeorge06
Sonicgeorge06 Sonicgeorge06
LV.11 Champion 2mo

This chat dead

This chat dead
Bouncyboo
Bouncyboo Bouncyboo
LV.12 Champion 2mo

First Impressions: TowerFall Ascension

TowerFall Ascension is a fast-paced archery combat game featuring easy to learn yet hard to master gameplay mechanics. TowerFall Ascension comes from the makers of the award-winning Celeste, and although it’s a much different type of game, TowerFall Ascension has received similar levels of acclaim. What makes TowerFall Ascension so special?
TowerFall Ascension is very similar to Super Smash Bros. in that much of the gameplay is centered around sitting on the couch with your friends and playing local multiplayer matches against each other. Of course, we’re in the middle of a pandemic right now so thankfully TowerFall Ascension also includes a Quest campaign mode which can be played solo or co-op with one other person. In Quest mode, you play as an archer who must defeat randomly generated waves of enemies in order to progress from one level to the next. As you move from level to level, the difficulty increases and your skills are quickly put to the test.
TowerFall Ascension has extremely basic controls yet surprisingly intricate, demanding gameplay. In this game you can defeat enemies by shooting them with an arrow or by stomping on their heads Mario style. You only have a very limited supply of arrows so if you choose to shoot at your enemies, you’ll have to retrieve your arrows from their corpses. Perhaps the most important mechanic in the game is the dodge ability. Dodging not only allows you to evade enemy attacks, but it also serves as a dash and double jump, and can even enable you to steal enemy arrows that are shot in your direction. Despite the extremely limited move set in TowerFall, you’ll need to completely master these mechanics in order to find success.
The enemies in TowerFall Ascension are each unique and provide their own set of attacks and challenges. Although the levels are somewhat randomly generated, this creates a learning element as you’ll need to figure out the best way to defeat your foes. For example, some enemies you can stomp on freely while other enemies will attack you from below. Some enemies are easy to shoot with an arrow while other enemies will steal your arrow and fire it back at you. Knowing the strengths and weaknesses of each enemy will arm you with the vital information you need if you want to stand a chance in the difficult fight ahead.
This game is brutally difficult. Much like some of Celeste’s bonus levels, TowerFall Ascension takes its simple ruleset and manages to create beautiful challenges out of it. This game will push your mechanical abilities and your mental ones as well. Friendly fire is on in this game and this plays a big effect regardless of whether you play solo or co-op. Your own arrows and attacks can and will hurt you and you constantly have to be on your toes in this game. It’s not unusual to fire an arrow up at an enemy, jump to avoid an enemy attack, and then dash through your arrow so you don’t die to your own attack falling back at you.
TowerFall Ascension is a great combat game with refined yet challenging gameplay. I do feel that there are shortcomings with the game however. I would have liked a more robust and meaningful Quest mode as I think it could have been used to enhance the multiplayer couch co-op. For example, Super Smash Bros. is likewise known for its multiplayer couch co-op, but the single player campaign mode is still worthwhile and enables players to unlock new characters. That said, TowerFall Ascension is still an enjoyable little game and the frenetic, skill-demanding gameplay is definitely worthwhile for those who like a bit of a challenge.
 
Ryan’s Rating: 4/5
 
TowerFall Ascension retails for $15 and is available on PC, PS4, Xbox One, and Nintendo Switch.

First Impressions: TowerFall Ascension +4
First Impressions: TowerFall Ascension
Ryan
Ryan Ryan
verified Admin 2mo

Has anyone played Carrion?

The game looks pretty fun but I want some second opinions! Thanks

Has anyone played Carrion?
FlutterArts
FlutterArts FlutterArts
LV.21 S 2mo

Cuphead may be coming to PlayStation

A game listing for Cuphead has appeared on international PS Stores.
 
Source: https://www.reddit.com/r/gamernews/comments/hz4meg/rumor_cuphead_may_be_coming_to_ps4/

Cuphead may be coming to PlayStation
moshking96
moshking96 moshking96
LV.23 Boo! 2mo

Does anyone know of a good indie horror?

Does anyone know of a good indie horror?
Cerberus Charmer
Cerberus Charmer Cerberus Charmer
LV.13 Chief 2mo

Made some noise pixel art I wanna know you all's opinion

Made some noise pixel art I wanna know you all's opinion
Chiprince08
Chiprince08 Chiprince08
LV.6 Genius 2mo

Oof I forgot about the photo

Oof I forgot about the photo
Oof I forgot about the photo
Chiprince08
Chiprince08 Chiprince08
LV.6 Genius 2mo

Hello Neighbor 2 Revealed

Looks like there's a different antagonist this time
 
Source: https://www.gameinformer.com/xbox-games-showcase/2020/07/23/hello-neighbor-2-pits-you-against-a-mysterious-creature

Hello Neighbor 2 Revealed
moshking96
moshking96 moshking96
LV.23 Boo! 2mo

First Impressions: Hue

Hue is a narrative puzzle platformer with a heavy emphasis on color-centric gameplay. As you embark on a journey to restore color to a dark and grey world, the secrets of your environment slowly reveal themselves as the story unfolds. With a gorgeous aesthetic and a vibrant premise, what kind of colorful gameplay does Hue have in store?
In Hue, you play as the title character Hue, a silent, somber boy who is uniquely able to control colors. The world is almost entirely grey, with the only dashes of color existing as blockades that have disrupted the way of life of this world’s inhabitants. At first you are as colorless as the rest of the world but as your journey progresses, you will expand your palette one color at a time until you’ve acquired an arsenal full of vibrant colors.
The puzzling in this game is fairly straightforward. When you select a background color from your color wheel, blocks of that color disappear from the foreground, enabling you to move past them. Blocks of other colors will then appear in the foreground, either presenting a new obstacle or a new tool which you can move around in order to progress through the level. There are also platforming elements to each puzzle, but most of the platforming is pretty linear and doesn’t require many precise or quick-twitch movements.
The game’s story is two-fold. On the surface, the story is about Hue’s quest to fill his color wheel and bring vibrancy into his bleak world. However, there is also a second story which is told through narration via letters that you pick up in game. This second story focuses on the real world, and is a pseudo-philosophical rendition of the developer’s journey through life.
While all of the major elements of Hue are reminiscent of qualities I’ve loved in other games, I found Hue’s manifestation of these qualities to be lacking pretty much across the board. The story is boring, and the pseudo-philosophical narrative is frankly laughable. The game tries to present questions like “What if your blue isn’t the same as my blue?” as if it’s some profound, revolutionary statement. It’s like putting peanut butter and jelly on a sandwich and genuinely believing that you’re a master chef. It might be amusing at first, but it gets really old very quickly.
The platforming is extremely lackluster and feels unpolished. The puzzles, for the most part, are very easy, yet they take an annoyingly long time to complete. The fun of a puzzle game is figuring out how to solve the puzzle, not going through the motions of inputting the solution. Unfortunately, there were many times in Hue when I walked into a level, instantly saw how to solve the puzzle, but then had to spend 5 minutes moving things around to actually execute the solution. This isn’t fun, at least not for me.
I don’t want to portray Hue as a game that has no redeemable qualities. The art is truly gorgeous and the music is pleasant, but beyond that I feel like this game takes a bunch of decent ideas and executes them to a mediocre level. I do think that this game could appeal to novices and those who typically find most puzzle games to be too difficult, but an experienced puzzle platformer will likely find Hue to be too easy, too tedious, and too boring. I think Hue offers something for someone, but that someone just isn’t me.
 
Ryan’s Rating: 3/5
 
Hue retails for $15 and is available on PC, PS4, Xbox One, PS Vita, and Nintendo Switch.

First Impressions: Hue +5
First Impressions: Hue
Ryan
Ryan Ryan
verified Admin 2mo

Anyone with me?

Who plays among us? I'm finding friends to play with

Anyone with me?
Anyone with me?
HotHandLuke
HotHandLuke HotHandLuke
LV.22 Myers 2mo

How many of you like "Don't Starve Together"?

Yesterday, I tried Don't Starve Together for the very first time that too on my live stream due to the request from my community... It was super fun! The whole of the community went LOL when I died due to dark...
 
Indie games are fun, Like if "you agree".......
It makes you laugh and make people watching it laugh...

How many of you like "Don't Starve Together"?
TheAverageAgentYT
TheAverageAgentYT TheAverageAgentYT
LV.18 Sage 2mo

I held my breath until the very end of the song 😩

One of the most fun I've had in awhile with a ranked song. I was surprised that I managed to full combo this and obviously beyond happy that I did 🤣
 
Full HD video: https://youtu.be/hbYP2gHSP0I
Follow me on Moot or subscribe on YouTube for more VR content!
#BeatSaber
#videos

I held my breath until the very end of the song 😩
I held my breath until the very end of the song 😩
VauseKV
VauseKV VauseKV
LV.22 Dream Chaser 2mo
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